Blacksheep of Diving Birds

Blacksheep of Diving Birds

Indian Darter aka the snakebird (Anhinga melanogaster)is a common sight you see in and around the villu’s in the Yala National Park.

It stands out from its “friends”; the Commorns for not having the oil glands to give a wax effect to his wings.

This beautiful bird landed on the branch with open wings to sun dry their wings after a dive into the waters. [ As he doesn’t have the luxury of having an oily wax coat ] They are always observing disturbances in the water with their long flexible neck which works like a spear darting into the waters in a blink of an eye at the sight of a fish.

This beautiful picture of an Indian Darter was captured by Chris Ang, an award winning photographer from new york on a Safari to the national park with Mahoora tented safari camps Yala in February 2019.

THE SRI LANKAN FISHING CAT

THE SRI LANKAN FISHING CAT

It is common knowledge that cats don’t like water and prefer to stay away from it all costs. Larger animals of the species such as the Tiger and the Jaguar defeat this notion by adapting to the surrounding wetlands of their habitat. In Sri Lanka however we are home to the Sri Lankan Fishing Cat a very unique creature that has adopted to not only live in wetlands, but thrive in it.  Read more

The Photogenic Sri Lankan Sloth Bear

In a real “messy hair don’t care” angle, the Sri Lankan sloth bear looks like it just got out of bed after a night out in the jungle; it ambles around Sri Lanka’s dry zone wooded areas in a shaggy coat, in search of food. They usually keep to themselves, often found grunting and snorting nosily, with its nose to the ground, while walking in search of food. The sloth bears’ main diet consists of termites and ants, however, being omnivores, they feed on almost anything from plants and animals, to fruit and insects.

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Giants of Asia

The subspecies of Asian elephants are classified under 3 main categories; the endemic species to Sri Lanka is called Elephas maximus maximus, the subspecies of elephants across the Indian sub-peninsula and indo-china territory is called Elephas maximus indicus, and the third group across a specific area of Sumatra Island is called Elephas maximus sumatranus. There is no remarkable difference between the subspecies of the Asian elephant and African elephant.

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The National Bird of Sri Lanka

South East Asia has four different species of jungle fowls and one of them belongs to Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan Jungle Fowl is endemic to Sri Lanka which means you can only see them here. Like most birds, the male Jungle Fowl is more beautiful than its female. The Jungle Fowl is referred to as the “Wali Kukkula” in Sinhalese which is a suitable name for the bird as the male fowls are territorial when they spot another male fowl in their area. Read more

On foot you feel, hear, smell it …

Ahaspokuna a destination for those who are looking for something different. It is Sri Lanka’s first ever private wildlife reserve and walking safari camp.

On the 23rd of March during a trek from Ahaspokuna to Gan Ella Waterfalls, where one would usually come across the experience of viewing various kinds of birds and butterflies. Our very own naturalist Manjula got a peculiar scent of something foul close to the waterfall. Read more